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Discussion Starter #1
Most of us at some point take pictures of animals. Let's share tips and some of our own photos of animals. It's tempting to post photos of our pets, but goodness gracious, the intrawebs are bursting with cute cat pics, let's have a refuge here and put cats into the family photos thread.

One of my favorite things about this genre is getting the right image is like hunting. For the very best images, it helps to know the terrain, the animal's behavior, and your tools. Quite primal in a sense. Plus, with the camera you can shoot them many times, with a rifle, not so much.

Birds are everywhere and can be a lot of fun, so we'll start with them.
Here's some Great Beginner Tips for Photographing Birds.

Show us what you got!
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Aransas Wildlife Refuge is a bird watchers dream and is home to very rare whooping cranes during the winter.
On a birding boat tour, noticed a group of pelicans, one was obviously getting ready to take off. Quicky figured out wind direction, they gotta launch into the wind, just like planes. Guesstimated the flight path. Preset my camera with settings and focus for where I thought I could catch the bird on the wing. Had to get it right the first time, there would be no second chance.

Here's what I got, no problem with critique of any photos I post in this sub-forum:

ISO-200; f/6.3; 1/2500 sec; 250mm (35mm equivalent = 375mm)
Lens: Nikkor 70-300mm F/4.5-6.3 VR, fairly inexpensive telephoto zoom. Heavier and pricier lens gets better detail, but this shot wasn't for Nat Geo.


Saw this in Vietnam, but didn't want just another parrot picture. Cropped it to the most interesting part of any bird, it's eye, to get a more unique image. You may see the image is much different than a full head shot. This same concept is very good for travel photography: do something different for a commonly photographed subject.
 

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Friendly kookaburra sunbaking with a piece of meat in beak

Dont know what birds are to do with cars but here we go ,ok here is my photo of one of five kookaburras I feed every day morning and night ,they fly up onto the balcony and wait to be feed .this one was sunbaking they go into a trans like state and they just sit there in the sun ,I just fed him a piece of meat as you can see ,you can also give them a pat on the back ,they are lovely birds ,and the other photo is of 3 corella,s they came one day and sat on the washing line ,they look like the 3 amigos nice wild birds .
 

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This is some expert stuff right here. Makes me and my DSLR feel like a first gen flip phone in terms of picture quality. I'm just going to sit back and watch you guys, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Dont know what birds are to do with cars
Park your newly washed car under a tree and you'll be reminded of the close relationship between birds and cars.
This is the Photography section of the Off-topic forum. Is there a different term in Oz for 'off-topic'? Here it means 'not about cars'.

This is some expert stuff right here. Makes me and my DSLR feel like a first gen flip phone in terms of picture quality. I'm just going to sit back and watch you guys, lol.
Aw c'mon. We learn a lot about our SS in other parts of the site, here's where we're sharing info about photography. Learn by doing. You can get helpful tips and critique to improve your skills. I'll show mine, you show yours.
 

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The wife took this in the backyard yesterday.
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If you want to photograph deer in the wild go to Stonewall resort in WV. At times there are more deer on the golf course than golfers. They are almost tame so they will stop and pose for you if you do not rush them.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Wildlife photo opps aren't difficult to find, especially birds. As habitat disappears, animals are adapting to urban life. You don't need fancy gear to snag good pics.
Couple of decades ago our bayous (glorified drainage channels) were devoid of life. After they got cleaned up fish started appearing. Wasn't too long before the fishing birds arrived. Today, there's a wealth of photo opps just a short walk away.

Egrets and herons hang out on the concrete bank waiting for the right moment. Still haven't caught the full fish-in-bill shot, here's a simple shot of an egret with a small snack.


This heron sometimes sleeps in one of our trees, scares the whoop out of me when he suddenly takes off from a dark yard.
 

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Turkey Buzzard Fly Over



A couple young Bucks at our bird feeder



The Deer seem to know where the electric fence line is

 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
An important rule for photography is "Get Close".
Brazos Bend State Park is well known for being home to alligators and an extraordinary bird watcher's destination:


Blue hour (between sunset golden hour and astronomical twilight) is a fave time for pics and very good for wildlife.
Shot off a monopod: ISO-1600; f/4.8; 1/30s; 135mm; no post-processing

 
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