Chevy SS Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,169 Posts
Watching those low-speed rolls over road debris, I don't see how this will work on higher speed impacts, but 4+ years is a long time for development. I like the idea if they can manage a semi-compliant ride with decent lateral stability. There goes all the Nitrogen profit though, haha.


Like air though, I think they'll need to devise a system that increases resistance as load increases. Kinda like a progressive spring on a car. If they tapered those vanes on the tires so that you were hitting thicker rubber with a heavier impact, it'd probably protect the wheel better, but I don't know how much weight would be added in doing so. I surmise they're gonna have a hard time replacing a thin sidewall and air with anything more functional without adding a weight penalty.


As a side note, those things look like a pain to clean!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Uptis tires... from the makers who brought you Updog.

Speedrye, i can see them doing the same thing bmw did with the runflats (stiff sidewalls) softened suspension to compensate.

cant see these tires setting any lap times at nurburgring. but for normal driving I've been waiting for these for 10 years since originally
announced.

ppp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I am skeptical that these can ever be tuned to meet all the functionality that a tire must provide. This type of “tire” has been under development for years, but getting anything even remotely close to the functionality / performance of a regular tire, even a run flat tire, is extremely difficult. Google “Tweel” for more on this type of tire from Michelin.

Other tire companies also have this type of airless technology.

Now, where I could see this being viable is on autonomous vehicles. It could be a whole different ballgame if the tires and suspension only had to be tuned for passengers and no driver feedback was needed. This type of application could be viable on low speed, autonomous urban vehicles by 2024 possibly….
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,275 Posts
Fine for my lawn tractor, NOT for my performance car, NOT for tractor trailers I share the road with.........yet
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Looking at the side profile with its countless receptacles for mud/crud/pebbles/etc. , I'm thinking it could be a nightmare to keep the wheel balanced properly ( unless you only drive clean roads). :-/
... one may think that open sidewall is for "demonstration purposes" ...

I don't think they are that stupid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Looking at the side profile with its countless receptacles for mud/crud/pebbles/etc. , I'm thinking it could be a nightmare to keep the wheel balanced properly ( unless you only drive clean roads). :-/

Snow would be the primary "added" weight concern, in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,169 Posts
... one may think that open sidewall is for "demonstration purposes" ...

I don't think they are that stupid.

Most articles I've read have specified no sidewalls. I'm hoping that just means you're right in that there are no structural sidewalls, but the innards are still covered.


Looking at the basic design, the wheel's barrel will have to contact with the tire continuously, wouldn't it? I don't see the load-distribution working without a wheel in the center to press against. Curious to see if these are universal to wheels or wheel specific, meaning no aftermarket wheels.


I'm not sure what problem this tire is solving. No increase in tread life, no decrease in weight, no benefits that I can see aside from being a better solution for cars that no longer have spares. Obviously, if you're too stupid or ignorant to maintain air in your tires, these might be a better option for you, but beyond that, I don't get it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
...I'm not sure what problem this tire is solving. No increase in tread life, no decrease in weight, no benefits that I can see aside from being a better solution for cars that no longer have spares. Obviously, if you're too stupid or ignorant to maintain air in your tires, these might be a better option for you, but beyond that, I don't get it.
The almighty Google says there are 220 million flat tires in the US every year. Even if people have spares (an estimated third of new cars do not) and are competent enough to safely change it on the side of the road (a fraction of the public), I think the benefit is pretty obvious. Instead of stranding someone on the side of the road in the rain (or, in the case of a runflat tire, buying you X miles before you have to stop), this remains completely unaffected by a normal puncture--the driver may not even notice. No jacking the car up on a gravel shoulder as 18 wheelers go by at 70+ mph, no replacing a half-used tire (or all of them) because of a single poorly placed screw, no lost time in transit, less road debris for the rest of us...

It's probably not a benefit I personally am interested in--but I get it.

-TH24
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,020 Posts
These tires will also fail if they hit hard road debris or big pot holes. It won't solve the problem but should reduce it.

I think the manufactures like them because they are maintenance free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
lower cost for manufacturing materials as well.
potentially can make them at the tire shops.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,169 Posts
The almighty Google says there are 220 million flat tires in the US every year. Even if people have spares (an estimated third of new cars do not) and are competent enough to safely change it on the side of the road (a fraction of the public), I think the benefit is pretty obvious. Instead of stranding someone on the side of the road in the rain (or, in the case of a runflat tire, buying you X miles before you have to stop), this remains completely unaffected by a normal puncture--the driver may not even notice. No jacking the car up on a gravel shoulder as 18 wheelers go by at 70+ mph, no replacing a half-used tire (or all of them) because of a single poorly placed screw, no lost time in transit, less road debris for the rest of us...

It's probably not a benefit I personally am interested in--but I get it.

-TH24

I'd love to know the percentage of tire failures that are caused by maintenance issues or neglect. I'm guessing it's a majority.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top