Chevy SS Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Who's gonna help?
We have lots of knowledgeable and experienced car photographers on this board. I'm not one of them.

Here's a few links, find what works for you:
How To Take Great iPhone Photos Of Cars & Vehicles
7 Tips for Taking Better Photographs of Cars
Tips for Taking a Perfect Car Photo
The 5 Biggest Mistakes Newbie Car Photographers Make
How to Photograph Cars Like a Pro
Crazy Stupid Advanced Buttload of Tutorials Page

Howza about some tips from those who've been there before?

@scooter trash, @Kannon, @stembridge, @Tee, @angrybot, @Drone, @wilkin4, @Spaz, @LS3 POWER, @Broooster, @wolds, @RCFiddyOne, et. al. What say you?

Inquiring minds want to know. Lot of views in a short time with nothing to show yet. Help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Couple of good suggestions!

Love photography (Canon has way too much of my money...) Here's a photo of one of my previous cars on the blue ridge parkway, and one of a cat.

A few tips for car photos (the astute observer will note that I didn't follow either of these... )
1. Turn the front wheels - makes things a bit more exciting
2. Leave room in front of the car - it's generally a bit more pleasing when the viewer doesn't get the feeling that the car is about to drive right out of the picture (same applies to pictures of people - not about to walk out of the picture /not on the edge of frame facing out).


General tip... Photography is all about light, and lighting is usually best around sunset /sunrise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
I am no pro whatsoever lol. I shot the photos of my car with my Pixel 2 XL. The camera on the phone gets all of the credit. I recently upgraded to the Pixel 3 XL, so I need to get some shots with that to see how they turn out. Hopefully this Sunday since it sounds like a few of us might end up meeting up down in South Florida.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,628 Posts
I have hosted the SSOTM before for one year. I took a year off then restarted it in September of this year. The SSOTM is supposed to show off our wonderful SS's but in more cases than not the background, sky, surroundings, or weather were the most voted on than the actual SS. The SS was just a part of the photo not the subject of the photo.


In this SSOTM winning entry what do you see? The beautiful setting and oh and there is a PBM there too.




Now in this winning photo what do you see? The SS is the focus of the Photo and the background is the setting.



So when taking a photo do you want the car to be the subject or is the background or setting to be the story. Remember each photo is telling a story. And beauty is in the eye of the beerholder:grin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
A great way to learn any genre of photography is to study the work of those who've been successful in that area.
Every car photo tips sheet says 'background' is important.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
533 Posts
Simple tip that can make or break a photo...

Always check what is in the background. Many a good photo is ruined by having a tree or pole looking like it is sticking out of the subject
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
I’m far from being any type of photographer but I try to make sure the lighting is good. Especially with black wheels. Always bugs me when you can’t see the detail on the dark areas of the picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,269 Posts
Don't cheap out on the Lens

My Dad was the Pro and always used great Optics with his 35mm and 2 1/4 format Film Cameras. I hate taking pictures now because of my childhood stuck in the Darkroom and doing Weddings with Pops. Studied Optics at the University of Rochester instead and used Lens Design Programs to design and optimize optical systems too complicated for a basic "Ynu" hand raytrace.

With SLR Digital Cameras you need to match the proper lens to the proper Camera Body/Image Sensor. Ideally want your the lens to be Diffraction Limited and provide an image of a point source, like a distant star, to cover just 1-pixel on the camera's image sensor array. If you have an expensive camera with an array made up with smaller pixels for better resolution, don't use a Lens meant for an older or less expensive camera with larger pixel sizes. Some of my friends were disappointed when they tried to use a zoom lens from their older rig or cheaper aftermarket lens that fit on their higher megapixel new camera and got less than state of the art photographs.

For point and shoot digital cameras try to spend extra for integrated Zeiss or Leica/Lumix integrated lenses. Sony, Nikon, and Canon make good point and shoot cameras. For cell phones look to see if they use higher cost aspherical lens surfaces with higher megapixels for crisper images.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Thanks for the tag, but I surely dont know any tricks. Back when there was 35MM film, I used to do a lot of macro shots, and you had to pay much more attention to what you was doing because you had to pay to play. These days with digital, its snap away until you're happy. As far as car pics, the wife finds it totally ridiculous to pull over at a "cool spot" to take a pic of the car. So with that being said, most of my pics are from when I'm either alone, which isn't often in the SS, or we're on a trip and I'll pull over to check something out. At which point the car is rarely in any kind of position for anything cool, but I do try to be sneaky on occasion. Here is a hazy morning in W.Va. and a sunrise at work. 20180805_091636_1544830855090.jpg 20180420_084807_1544830929247.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
The SSOTM is supposed to show off our wonderful SS's but in more cases than not the background, sky, surroundings, or weather were the most voted on than the actual SS. <snip>
So when taking a photo do you want the car to be the subject or is the background or setting to be the story. Remember each photo is telling a story. And beauty is in the eye of the beerholder:grin.
Simple tip that can make or break a photo...
Always check what is in the background. Many a good photo is ruined by having a tree or pole looking like it is sticking out of the subject
Agree! Don't put a menorah in the background when folks are expecting Christmas. :laugh:

It's clear that setting makes or breaks the photo, this is addressed in some of the tips links in first post.
An SS in an empty parking lot will be appealing to minimalists. An SS in a crowded parking lot is just a car with lots of background noise.
SS at Everest Base Camp...Extraordinary!!
Think before you shoot. A little bit of effort in composing goes a long way. Be sure you get all of Mt. Everest in the image, if you cut off part of it then you've got the Twitter version of the full novel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Very useful accessory for car photography is a Circular Polarizer (CPL) filter. It will remove glare off paint and windshield, the glare looks like blown out white space in the image. It will also give you better sky in the background.
Know that a CPL will reduce your light by 1-2 stops, and cheapo filters can produce odd results.

Here's two waterfall images showing difference a CPL makes (can't find my car test images).
Images were taken at identical camera settings in the same minute, lighting was identical. Only adjustment was rotating the filter ring. No post processing in these images.

If you shoot in manual mode, then you're not allowing the camera mfg software engineer to dictate the look of your image.
ISO 400 (less grainy)
f/20 (more depth of focus field)
1/40 shutter (blur effect in water)
24mm (35mm equivalent = 36mm) (prime lens)

First image is with no polarizing adjustment. Second image utilizes the polarizer. Windshield and paint finish glare is handled the same. Which one is better?

Without polarization:


With polarization:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,628 Posts
So you do not have a bag full of filters what do you do?
I do not have any filters for my Sony Cyber-Shot, however I do have 10 different settings on the camera. It's digital and I try all of them because it costs nothing to try. Don't like that one, erase it and try another setting. Do not get trapped into using only the Automatic mode. Experiment, you will be surprised how different the other modes make your shot look. All of those 10 modes are on the camera for a reason. Also, Try using flash even if it is sunny. Sounds crazy to use a flash on a sunny day but you may have some dark areas that could use a little fill.
Experiment!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
One of the most important elements of car photography is a simple rule for lighting.
Have your back to the light source and the car in front of you. Natural light should be behind you.

Many images suffer because the sun was right over or behind the car. The unfortunate result is the features and lines on side of the car become faint and flattened. Show off your clean shiny finish by having the natural light behind you and this problem goes away.

ETA: Be sure that following this tip doesn't result in your own shadow cast upon the car and appearing in your image.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Sometimes the experience of capturing the image leaves the photographer imaging the picture is better than it really isn't. Many of us are guilty of this.
Garry Winograd would not look at an image for at least one year after he took it to remove any of the emotion of the moment.
Cow Creek Road is beautiful and a lot of fun. What I thought would be an amazing image leaves me underwhelmed.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
At the request of iratollah, here are a couple tips on photography. A lot is already covered in the articles posted, but here are the main things that come to mind for me. Thankfully I’ve had a professional photographer for a brother, so I’ve learned a lot from him!


  1. Don’t use your phone, I know it’s the latest and greats iPhone 89 but it won’t be half as good as a proper dslr. Keep in mind that the dslr is designed only to take pictures, while your phone has to do a lot of other stuff too.

  2. Get over thinking that editing/photoshoping/filtering a picture is bad, or cheating, or fake, or whatever you want to call it. If your using a phone camera, or shooting JPEG files with a proper camera, the photos are processed/edited already (If you are shooting in RAW this in not the case – more on this later.) Not to mention the pics coming from the camera never look quite as good as it looked in person, so editing helps fix that.
    • If you are planning to edit, and you’re using a DSLR or something decent, set it to RAW file mode. This will give you a much larger editing range and allow you to really get details out of the shadows or highlights when needed. The disadvantage to this is that RAW files typically take up about 4 times the space of a JPEG!
    • If your willing to spend some money on editing software Adobe is the place to go. There’s a reason Photoshop is a household name, it’s simply the best thing out there imo! Note: I don’t recommend these if you’re not planning to really get it to this and spend some time on it. With capability come complexity.
    • If you want something free and simple there’s tons of programs out there. They obviously won’t have the same capabilities, but generally do a good job. I have used Adobe Photoshop Express in the past and it works well.
    • Back to the note on file types: once you’re done editing there is no advantage of having it as a RAW file. You’ll want to save it as a JPEG to save space, but more importantly allow you to upload and share it across any platform you want.

  3. Background is very important. This doesn’t mean that it needs to be in front of the Eiffel tower, (in fact if the car is supposed to the focus this could be a bad thing!) Empty industrial parks, or a downtown street are common and good choices.

  4. Composition is also very important. Honestly this is the most difficult part in my opinion, and it’s not easy to figure out. Here are a couple ideas to think about anyways:
    • Leading lines: use lines that are leading (hence the name) to the focal point (the car in this case.) this might be lines on a road, or a line of lights, or trees.
    • Negative space: use an empty space on one side of the picture with your car and maybe some other objects on the other. This may seem like it would look out of balance, but it actually does the opposite.
    • Geometry: make use of background geometry and symmetry. Both are pleasing to the eye. This is why industrial scenes often look good, they offer a lot of both. Reflections are another way to get this.
    • Natural framing: just like it sounds, using the foreground to frame the subject. You will often see this done with trees.

Wow, OK, that ended up being lot, sorry about that! Hopefully it made a little sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
@LS3 VER33, great write-up! Thanks for posting it!
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top