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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a sort of mid-life stage for my 2016 Heron White SS, now at about 45,000 miles. I want to preserve her for the next 5 years minimum. I will not be driving it quite as much in the next few years, but will likely put on another 40k. Mechanically, I think things are good, but I don't really know what might become an issue in the future.
What things can I do to restore and maintain the paint and look for the next 5 years?
My SS really looks fantastic for her age, but I am seeing more rock chips and paint damage more noticeably now, I am actually surprised there are not more. White hides the swirls more than dark colors, but I am seeing some now. Initially, one or two tiny chips down low, I could live with that or touch it up, but now... Should I just take it into the dealer or body shop, and get the paint sanded, repainted, and looking hopefully, brand new? I am thinking of the front and rear panels/bumpers, and maybe the hood. What about ceramic coating? Too late for that? The ceramic shop here said they do paint correction? I am not sure that includes rock chips in the paint. Early on, I got into washing the car properly, not maniacally, or obsessive-compulsive, but I don't take it to commercial machine car washes, I wash it myself, or it does not get washed. I love the Zaino products.
History:
Starting out I really didn't know all about the massive number of modifications, issues, and money pit activities you can do with the beautiful car. I just liked driving it and it worked for my needs.
After a while, I caught the bug (as it seems we all do to one degree or another) to do some modifications. I got a Livernois Tune, AR racing headers, High Lift Stage 2 cam, Roto-fab CAI, and a few other engine-related things, new black Holden wheels, Holden conversion, black trim pieces, etc. These mods have been a blast and a real adventure. Now, I just want to maintain this fantastic car properly.
 

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Inception Date: 1 March 2017, Chevy SS Sedan, White, A6, Spare, No Sun
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If you decide to have the car repainted, then the best way to preserve the surface is to cover the whole front end with invisible bra material. I've done this on my last three cars, and the results are self-evident. I tried the ceramic coating and was disappointed with the cost value benefit. The attached photo(s) is my SS after 45k.

For what it's worth, it wouldn't hurt to start accumulating some spare suspension parts for when things start to get a little sloppy.
290210

290211
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is that "bra" material what some call X-pel? Is it a film, or is it a spray coating? Being a white car, did it change in the coloration of that area? Like more yellowish?
 

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Inception Date: 1 March 2017, Chevy SS Sedan, White, A6, Spare, No Sun
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Is that "bra" material what some call X-pel? Is it a film, or is it a spray coating? Being a white car, did it change in the coloration of that area? Like more yellowish?
Yes, it is a film and is sourced by a number of manufactures. No spray is going to be as effective against flying debris. I have not experienced any discoloration after 4+ years of use. The second photo that looks a little dull is based on lighting conditions inside my garage.
 

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I'm in kinda the same boat wrt rock chips. I don't have any PPF upfront and even after only 18K (and only 3K of that on highway) it shows. But a respray seems like a big investment (and potential to easily go wrong) for something you can't even see when driving the car.

I would find a good PPF shop in your area, ask them to touch up chips, correct paint, and apply PPF. They'll probably get it 95%, only the biggest chips still noticeable -- and that will easily last you the next 5 years.
 

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I plan to do a paint restore when the paint gets bad. Actually holding up well at this point. The sports armor hides the only serious scrapes I have. Bought some of the take off trim early on from members who re-badged and installed black trim kits. Collected a couple extra rims because I really really hate curb rash. Starting to put extra effort on preserving the plastic and vinyl bits. Have a new set headlamp housings and tail lamps as well.
 
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While waiting for my car to come from Australia, I went through the owner's manual and made a maintenance plan. It will give you an idea of what GM expects you to need. I also have some spare parts, mostly things that you touch when in the car.
 

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This is a sort of mid-life stage for my 2016 Heron White SS, now at about 45,000 miles. I want to preserve her for the next 5 years minimum. I will not be driving it quite as much in the next few years, but will likely put on another 40k. Mechanically, I think things are good, but I don't really know what might become an issue in the future.
What things can I do to restore and maintain the paint and look for the next 5 years?
My SS really looks fantastic for her age, but I am seeing more rock chips and paint damage more noticeably now, I am actually surprised there are not more. White hides the swirls more than dark colors, but I am seeing some now. Initially, one or two tiny chips down low, I could live with that or touch it up, but now... Should I just take it into the dealer or body shop, and get the paint sanded, repainted, and looking hopefully, brand new? I am thinking of the front and rear panels/bumpers, and maybe the hood. What about ceramic coating? Too late for that? The ceramic shop here said they do paint correction? I am not sure that includes rock chips in the paint. Early on, I got into washing the car properly, not maniacally, or obsessive-compulsive, but I don't take it to commercial machine car washes, I wash it myself, or it does not get washed. I love the Zaino products.
History:
Starting out I really didn't know all about the massive number of modifications, issues, and money pit activities you can do with the beautiful car. I just liked driving it and it worked for my needs.
After a while, I caught the bug (as it seems we all do to one degree or another) to do some modifications. I got a Livernois Tune, AR racing headers, High Lift Stage 2 cam, Roto-fab CAI, and a few other engine-related things, new black Holden wheels, Holden conversion, black trim pieces, etc. These mods have been a blast and a real adventure. Now, I just want to maintain this fantastic car properly.
Paint correction will just get rid of minor scratches and swirls as it a couple step process that entails cutting the clear and then polishing it. Rock chips are only fixed with paint. As for a ceramic coating it's basically just a longer lasting wax job. As recommend by SaberOne, go with film protection (bumper, front fenders, hood, A pillars, mirrors), but I'd only do it if you have the rock chips fixed first as you'll have a bunch of bubbles from the chips if you don't.

Here's a video that explains film protection:

Step by step instructions on how to fix paint chips yourself:
DIY Paint Chip Repair with Pics
 

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I've noticed one of the worst offenders when it comes to an otherwise good looking car starting to look "aged" is when the head lamp lenses start to get that foggy look. It's always one of the first things to start going bad even if the rest of the car still looks good. And it looks HORRIBLE. Pretty much ruins the whole look of the car.

My 2015 SS lenses still look overall pretty good. But I did recently notice the slightest little hint of oxidation (foggy-ness) starting to appear on the upper most edge of my driver side lens. Not too noticeable yet really, but it really bummed me out. It's only a matter of time before it gets worse and it's not the easiest thing to remedy.

I will mention that my SS has always been garage kept. However it unavoidably has to sit out in the elements when I'm at work or other places of course.
 

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The only thing that I’ve seen the corrects an opaque lens is fine grinding with with 500, then 800 grit. Finish up with wet sanding the lens with polishing compound and a final polish with a dedicated lens cleaner.

This 3M web page describes what they have now. My stuff is several years old, but still works on all of my plastic lenses.

 
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